Directors

If you love a movie, you'll want to explore other works from the same director. Luckily for movie fans, the greatest directors are usually quite prolific. Discuss the directors you find admirable or over-rated.

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1102 days ago

Possibly Altman's Worst - no small feat, next to Popeye, Dr. T ,Quartet, OC & Stiggs, Brewster,Jimmy Dean, Theo, Cold Day, The Company,and so many more.

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2492 days ago

I'm a huge fan of Eastwood as a director and think he's actually underrated. Sure, he's had misses - sure, he's all over the map (as git says) but the real winners are evidence of a talented artist. I don't even think he should be on this list.

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2496 days ago

I'm a huge fan. In fact I think my first avatar on this site was a picture of Old Stoneface.

He was a daring, hilarious, inventive and athletic performer and possibly the father of the use of rigged sets and special effects in film. The Newlyweds most notably featured a poorly assembeled pre-fab house where the main door was on the second floor and all of the geometry was ludicrously out of skew. In the General he used his endless sense of invention to make a feature length action film around a Civil War era chase on a steam engine locomotive.

Great fun stuff, that in my book stands up better today than the pathos based comedy of Chaplin.

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2497 days ago

The Hurt Locker is better than Point Break, but that's not saying much. I'm not familiar with the rest of her work, if there is more.

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2497 days ago

Jay: [Bethany, Jay, and Silent Bob are sitting in a diner; the guys are staring at Bethany expectantly] So what's up? You have a friend for Silent Bob or are you just gonna do us both? If so, I'm first. I hate sloppy seconds.
Bethany: You're a man of principle. Jersey's pretty far from McHenry, may I ask what brought you here?
Jay: Some fuck named John Hughes.
Bethany: "16 Candles" John Hughes?
Jay: You know that guy too? That fuckin' guy. He made this flick, "16 Candles". Not bad, there's tits in it but no bush. But Ebert over here don't give a shit about that kind of thing, 'cause he's like, all in love with this John Hughes guy.
[Silent Bob shakes his head with a "whatever" look on his face]
Jay: He goes out and rents, like, every one of his movies. Fuckin' "Breakfast Club", where all these stupid kids actually show up for detention. Fuckin' "Weird Science", where this babe wants to take her gear off and get down, but oh no, she don't, 'cause it's a PG movie. And then "Pretty in Pink", which I can't even watch with this tubby bitch anymore 'cause every time he gets to the part where the redhead hooks up with her dream guy, he starts sobbin' like a little bitch with a skinned knee and shit. And there's nothing worse than watching a fuckin' fat man weep.
[Silent Bob blows out his cigarette smoke angrily]
Bethany: What exactly brought you to Illinois?
Jay: See, all these movies take place in this small town called Shermer in Illinois, where all the honeys are top-shelf but all the dudes are whiny pussies. Except for Judd Nelson, he was fuckin' harsh.
[he and Silent Bob bump fists]
Jay: But best of all, there was no one dealin', man. And then it hits me: we could live like FAT rats if we were the blunt connection in Shermer, Illinois. So we collected some money we were owed and caught a bus. But you know what the fuck we found out when we got there? There IS no Shermer in Illinois. Movies are fuckin' bullshit.

(Dogma, 1999)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120655/quotes

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2497 days ago

He was a screenwriter who directed his scripts. For a period his scripts struck a chord with a generation and everyone I knew saw themselves in at least one of the characters in one of his films. Granted I grew up a middle-class kid in a a mid-western suburb, so that made it a little easier to relate. As a director he was OK, but didn't really put a stamp on his films that set him apart in any way. Possibly his integration of pop music in the story was his mark.

He made a handful of period classics, that do stand up to mulitple viewings and are watched by my kids as if they were time capsule pieces. But he wasn't a great director.

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2497 days ago

In spite of the fact that he regularly casts fairly big name actors like Owen Wilson (in almost ever one of his films it seems), George Clooney, Gene Hackman, Bill Murray, Gwenyth Paltrow and more, his best films all feel like small independent movies. He's stuck to his knitting in making intimate character driven comedic-dramas (or is it dramatic-comedies) that have a gentle sense of humour and a skewed world view.

His first two films, Bottle Rocket and Rushmore are stone classics. After a couple of slight missteps with bigger budgets and I assume studio pressure - Royal Tennenbaums and The Life Aquatic ..., he got back on track with The Darjeeling Limited and a great little animated feature called The Fantastic Mr. Fox.

Regardless of his tier, I find him interesting and entertaining. He'll have a long career if he can avoid getting sucked into the Hollywood machine and continue to follow his muse. His films won't 'open big' or be discussed in terms of their international gross, but they'll be watchable for decades after their release. That's what movies should be about, creating durable art, not fast moving product.

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2497 days ago

How Lucas came up with him as his choice to take the reins for his second Star Wars film is probably worth a short book or a Space TV documentary.

As a director he had a solidly pedestrian resume, his biggest release prior to The Empire Strikes Back was a Fay Dunaway vehicle called the Eyes of Laura Mars, which I remember seeing but also forgot soon thereafter. After his turn on the Star Wars franchise, he helmed the sequel to Robocop and then dropped out of sight.

I can't imagine that directing the second Star Wars film took more effort than making sure the actors stood on their marks and didn't flub their lines. The rest of the film was driven by the obsessive tinkering with special effects. The big scene at the end of the film where Mark Hamill is confronted with his true identity isn't exactly one of the great moments in the craft of acting, granted it wasn't poorly done either.

Based on his resume Kershner is a footnote in film history at best.

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2497 days ago

He directed some of the most iconic movies in the 80's which gave birth to the 80's drinking game...

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2497 days ago

He directed in my opinion, the best Star Wars movie, The Empire Strikes Back. This man deserves the five, that's for sure.

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