Fruit and Vegetables

Not only are they healthy for you, fruit and vegetables can be extremely refreshing and enjoyable. Rate these wonders of nature, and be introduced to fruits you might never have heard of (Durian, anyone? No, it's not a post-nuclear weapon, despite its appearance).

Recent Happenings

16 days ago

Review Icon twansalem reviewed Shishito in Peppers:
Shishito peppers make for great snacks. Saute them in olive oil until the skin blisters and the most minimal amount of blackening, then sprinkle with salt. Done.

Shishitos are very mild, with either no or very minimal heat.

I've never grown them before, but will be trying for the first time this year.

Add your Vote:

Votes on this review: 3 Helpful / 0 Funny / 0 Agree / 0 Disagree

17 days ago

Review Icon Zoose reviewed Hot Cherry in Peppers:
I like these on subs and in salads.

Add your Vote:

Votes on this review: 0 Helpful / 0 Funny / 0 Agree / 0 Disagree

17 days ago

Review Icon Zoose reviewed Scotch Bonnet in Peppers:
These are really hot, so a little goes a long way.

Add your Vote:

Votes on this review: 0 Helpful / 0 Funny / 0 Agree / 0 Disagree

18 days ago

The New Mexico pod type of chile is the primary ingredient in green chile, which is one of my favorites.
The real purists (who also always seem to live in a location with a long growing season, enabling them to be purists) insist on growing heirloom varieties such as Big Jim or 6-4. However, if you are a northern gardener like me, and/or have a relatively small garden, I'd recommend a hybrid such as biggie chile. They have a significantly shorter growing season, which means an early fall frost won't interfere with the peak of your harvest, and they have exceptional yields, which means you can fill your freezer with roasted peppers even if you only have 6 to 8 plants. Going with a faster growing hybrid also means you can let some of them turn red. I like to have my freezer packed with lots of green and red peppers every fall.


Making green chile is fairly easy, although a bit time consuming. You need about 20-30 large green chiles, roasted, peeled, and seeded (Make sure to wear gloves while handling the peppers. While most New Mexico type peppers are relatively mild as far as hot peppers go, by the time you handle 30 of them with your bare hands you'll be feeling the capsaicin). Brown 1.5-2 pounds of pork cut into bite size chunks, along with some onion and garlic. When the pork is browned and cooked through, add the peppers, a few roma tomatoes (and ONLY a few, we're not making a standard red chile con carne here, the resulting stew should still be basically green. If it starts looking orange/red, you've added way too many tomatoes). Add liquid: beer and/or chicken broth is my preference, but plain old water will work just fine as well. Add spices that suit your tastes: salt, black pepper and cumin are a must, but you can also add such things as coriander, oregano, or celery seed. Bring to a boil, and then reduce heat and simmer for about an hour, adding water as necessary. There's a very wide range in heat levels of these peppers, so how hot your green chile comes out depends on the specific variety of pepper you used. If you really like it hot, you can always add a few hotter peppers to your chile as well. There's a lot of room for experimenting here. For example, you can try adding potatoes, or substituting chicken for the pork.

UPDATE: A lot has changed in my Chile growing experience in the last few years since RIA has been offline. New Mexico pod types are still some of my favorites, but I've found I can successfully grow heirloom varieties such as Big Jim and still get large yields. Dehydrating red ones also makes for really tasty chile powder.

Add your Vote:

Votes on this review: 3 Helpful / 0 Funny / 1 Agree / 0 Disagree

19 days ago

This was the first capsicum baccatum I've grown. I didn't know what to expect, but they germinated very easily with high germination rates, and the plants were loaded with small yellow peppers that we're about as hot as cayennes but with their own unique flavor. The plants and peppers themselves were smaller than given in most descriptions of the variety, but I attribute that to growing a pepper developed in the Andes in Iowa.

Add your Vote:

Votes on this review: 1 Helpful / 0 Funny / 0 Agree / 0 Disagree

1238 days ago

The Double Delight seeds are rather expensive (about $8 for a packet of 20), and you can't save the seeds since it's a hybrid variety, but they're easily worth it anyway.

I can't grow bell peppers worth a damn. But now I don't care. This bullhorn shaped variety of sweet pepper completely eliminates the need for growing bell peppers. The seeds germinate better, the plants are healthier, and they're loaded with peppers (unlike bell peppers which sometimes only set one or two fruits per plant). The resulting peppers actually ripen to red or yellow without going bad like bell peppers. The peppers themselves are huge, and basically taste like a bell pepper, only significantly sweeter. I grew these for the first time this year, and will almost certainly be doing so again next year. I don't think it was just a lucky year either, because I gave some of my leftover plants to my mom, and hers did well too. None of her bell pepper plants survived this year, but these did just fine.

Add your Vote:

Votes on this review: 0 Helpful / 0 Funny / 0 Agree / 0 Disagree

1238 days ago

Poblano peppers are what you usually get in a chile relleno. The taste is somewhat similar to a green bell pepper, but with just a touch of heat. The dried version of this pepper is the ancho, which tastes very different from the fresh poblano. I'm attempting to grow a larger hybrid variety of poblano this year, but the seeds I recently planted are having a relatively low germination rate compared to my other pepper varieties.

UPDATE: The seeds I planted this spring may have had a poor germination rate, but what did come up more than made up for it. I have five poblano plants loaded with peppers right now. I dried and ground some for the first time this year, and it makes for a very interesting, sort of earthy chile powder.

Add your Vote:

Votes on this review: 1 Helpful / 0 Funny / 0 Agree / 0 Disagree

1354 days ago

Review Icon Emtee reviewed Sour cherry in Fruit:
Too many bananas, is my guess

Add your Vote:

Votes on this review: 0 Helpful / 0 Funny / 0 Agree / 0 Disagree

1354 days ago

Review Icon Emtee reviewed Raisins in Fruit:
The Wrath of Grapes

Add your Vote:

Votes on this review: 0 Helpful / 0 Funny / 0 Agree / 0 Disagree

1355 days ago

Review Icon Emtee reviewed Boysenberry in Fruit:
Just below Black on the list of berries

Add your Vote:

Votes on this review: 0 Helpful / 0 Funny / 0 Agree / 0 Disagree

View Next Subject: Herbs & Spices

Top Fruit and Vegetables Reviewers