edt4
member since 01/14/2005
I'm a guy
User Votes: 14170 Helpful / 1289 Funny / 2708 Agree / 539 Disagree
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26 days ago

The less I think about that, the better I sleep at night.

26 days ago

I started going gray in my mid 20's, and got panicky when I realized it was happening, but the young lady who pointed it out to me reassured me that if I were going gray that early in life, it meant I wasn't going to go bald. At the time, I didn't know my genetic history (I'm adopted), and occasionally worried about baldness. What she said reassured me; better gray than bald. I still don't know if what she said was true or something she made up on the spot, but I held on to it for many years.

Now, I'm well into middle age, my hair is more gray than anything else, but it's still pretty full. I'm content with my gray hair. I have a friend my age who is a millionaire, and still intends to become a multi-millionaire. He colors his hair now. Maybe it's because I've known him since we were 7 years old, but it looks fake and a bit unnerving to me when I see it (think of Udo Kier coloring his white hair dark in "Andy Warhol's Dracula"). He says he has to do it, being in competition with so many young men. I guess. In my own case, I think I'd probably be just as poor as I am now, gray hair or dark hair.

My birth mother, who is 16 years older than me, dyes her gray hair brown. I thought she looked fine with gray hair, but if it makes her feel better to dye it, then so be it.

Me, I'm perfectly content with my gray hair, just so long as I have a full head of it. If that's the worst thing I have to worry about in life, I'll count myself lucky.

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26 days ago

This one is going to make me sound like a shallow, juvenile misogynist, but it happened fairly recently, and, well...it is what it is. A friend of mine was going to some sort of rural "home goods" store to get a gas container for his outdoor grill (I don't cook, much less grill, so I'm really out of touch with activities like this), and I went along with him for the ride. At the store, we saw an older woman I recognized as my high school English teacher. He also knew her (he's a year or 2 younger than me, so he had her class at a later date than I did), and evidently had met her here and there during the intervening years, as she called him by name and said hello with obvious fondness. Her eyes glanced in my direction, and I saw a flash of recognition, although it was obvious she didn't remember my name or which of her classes I had been in (I had liked her well enough, I guess, as a teacher, but I'm not one to try and maintain contact with my high school classmates, much less my high school teachers--- I do remember that she had taken a trip to England, and on returning, told me she had occupied the plane compartment with a bunch of young guys who turned out to be the Sex Pistols; she knew I was into punk rock and had thought about approaching them to get an autograph for me "but they acted like animals and I was too nervous"--- at that time, I worshipped the Sex Pistols and felt rage and despair that she had missed a golden opportunity to get the autographs of my heroes, but I digress...) I wasn't offended by her not remembering me--- its been a decade or 2 (or 3) since I last darkened the doorway of my ol' high school, and I have trouble remembering people I met a few months ago, much less a few decades ago.

Her hair had turned from inky black to solid white, which was fine and to be expected (my hair isn't exactly the same color it was in high school either, and my friend is pretty much bald), but she also had visible white hairs growing from above her upper lip and hanging down like those of a goat. I've heard of post-menopausal women with mustaches and I respect women who have no shame in aging naturally, but this was disturbing. Very disturbing. The thickness of this particular womanly mustache might have made Wyatt Earp proud. My friend is even worse about such things than I am; his degree of repulsion was palpable. I could see her moving in towards him for a kiss, and he manuevered himself gingerly backwards like a snake, hastily sticking out his hand, taking hers, and shaking it with vigor, telling her heartily, "How are you, Mrs. ___________? Good to see ya again." They exchanged some small talk and, luckily for him, she forgot about that kiss. He bought his gas container, and we left.

On the way back to his house, he kept saying, "My God, did you get a load of that bush? Hasn't she ever heard of a razor? Shave that f'ing thing off already!" Teasing him, I said, "Why didn't you kiss her when she leaned in like that? Obviously, she likes you." He shook his head and answered seriously, "I couldn't have. I would have lost my cookies right there on the floor. They would have been cleaning up vomit. I mean, I didn't want to hurt her feelings, right?"

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26 days ago

Review Icon edt4 reviewed Turk 182! in Drama Movies:
I'm all for "feel good" movies, but there needs to be a certain element of reality and/or logic involved, or it isn't going to work, and "Turk 182" doesn't work. This 1985 "comedy" has a lot of good people involved in it, which makes its failure all the more galling. Firefighter Terry Lynch (Robert Urich) is injured while bravely fighting a fire and saving a little girl, but the city refuses to pay him compensation because he was drinkin' a little bit before he actually rushed off to do his duty. His younger brother Jimmy (Timothy Hutton) is outraged, and decides to retaliate by putting politically-charged graffiti everywhere you can imagine, in order to humiliate the Mayor (Robert Culp).

It's all contrived, and not for one minute convincing, or genuinely involving. I was waiting for subtitles every time Culp or his Chief of Security Ryan (Peter Boyle) appeared on screen, signifying, "Bad, bad bureaucracy! Damn that unfeeling, callous system! Go Turk! Stick it to the Man! Get 'im!" In case the audience isn't cheering, the Greek Chorus in the movie (bar patrons, baseball game attendees, hospital patients, etc.) show us what we should be doing, and feeling, by cheering Turk on, or boo'ing Culp, or thwarting Boyle as he attempts to prevent Hutton from putting up yet another graffiti-type message. Needless to say, everyone cheers Hutton enthusiastically-- there's not one dissenting voice or opinion. Urich and Hutton are noble and sincere; Culp and Boyle are ambitious, unfeeling Establishment figures. In case this is just too simplistic, Director Bob Clark attempts to humanize Culp in the end by having him cheer Hutton's efforts too, even as his political career is destroyed. Realistic? Hell, no. But I guess if you've bought everything that's transpired in the film so far, you'll buy that.

Director Clark has made crap, but he's also made films that I've enjoyed, from low-budget cult classic "Children Shouldn't Play With Dead Things" to the really-worth-watching low-budget horror film "Deathdream." Here, it's obvious he wants to make a Capra-esque or Spielberg type movie, but he ends up instead with a film that feels like a TV sitcom, a particularly bad TV sitcom. I've never been a big fan of Timothy Hutton, but he's done decent work ("Ordinary People"). I actually found Kim Cattrall cute and sexy in this film, something that never happened when my ex-girlfriend forced me to watch "Sex and the City." And I love the rest of the cast-- I've always been a fan of the late Robert Culp, the late Peter Boyle, and the late Darren McGavin. (An interesting footnote-- this film has several alumni from one of my favorite films of all time in it. The film is "The Friends of Eddie Coyle" and the alumni are Boyle, Steven Keats...who sadly would go on to commit suicide, and James Tolkan.)

Basically, it's missing the complexity of real life, and maybe the writers are at fault, or maybe the blame can be fairly laid solely on Clark, who was also responsible for the execrable "Porky's." Whatever or whoever is responsible, this was a tough one to sit through. Two hours of my life that I'll never get back.

One final side note: as someone who was born and raised in the NJ/NY area, and has relatives from the Bronx to Brooklyn, I get tired when actors in a movie out of Hollywood attempt to approximate what they think someone from Brooklyn or the Bronx sounds like or acts like. If you're from the NJ/NY area, and you have a good ear (which I like to think I do), you can tell from someone's accent whether they're from East Tremont, or Yorkville (my grandmother and Jimmy Cagney came from this neighborhood, and my grandmother used to sound like Ed Norton from "The Honeymooners," saying "Ernion" for "Onion" and "Erl" for "Oil") or the South Bronx, or the Lower East Side, or Brownsville. In movies like this, everyone does a pseudo-Brooklyn "dese, dem and dose" accent that never fails to grate on my nerves, and rattles out a constant stream of nonsense verbiage like someone with brain damage (I think this is meant to be charming and ingratiating, but...it's not), channeling Leo Gorcey, Vinnie Barbarino, and Sly Stallone from "Rocky." Of course, "Rocky" was supposed to be from Philadelphia, but I guess the people putting these films out figure the rubes in Iowa or Nebraska or Kansas won't be able to tell the difference. And maybe they won't, but it's a personal pet peeve of mine.

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26 days ago

Thanks, Ayn. The invite is always open.

40 days ago

Well, in so far as cancer goes, I would agree that it's perfectly understandable if a woman wants to do this. My point was about women having it done because of a cultural fixation on enormous breasts, and how silly it is to me. Understand that I'm certainly not opposed to plastic surgery if it makes a person feel better about themselves, whether it's breast enhancement in the case of women who have had cancer, or people with large noses, etc.

40 days ago

I've always been fascinated by the whole Jonestown story--- I can remember being a teenager when I first heard the story on the news; the reporters kept revising the body count-- "They've found 400 bodies...no, it's 700 bodies, no,no, it's actually..." I actually have a photo of myself standing in front of the People's Temple in San Francisco (it was a Korean church at the time) the first time I visitied that city.

In all these years, I've never been able to decide whether Jones was a sincere man of vision who descended into madness, or a charlatan and con-man, or a fascistic sociopathic who used religion as a means of obtaining power, or a drug-addled lunatic...or a combination of all these things.

"Frontline" had a special show about it a few years ago, and it was still an immensely disturbing story, and I imagine it always will be.

40 days ago

That's how I feel too. Unfortunately, it's true in the city too these days. I used to go to NY regularly to patronize independent bookstores, but the big chains like Barnes & Noble started coming in during the 80's, and the independents started getting squeezed out...unable to afford the rents, etc. At this point, I haven't been to NY in several years; easier to just go onto Amazon and push a button to order a book. Sometimes I feel bad about it, and I do miss NY, but the money I spend for what I get just isn't worth it anymore.

40 days ago

Very true. For those of a patriotic bent, it's the very antithesis of "rugged American individualism" and small businesses that, according to the mythology, are the very backbone of America. You can drive down any major road or highway in America, and every strip mall (or regular mall) will have the same 4 or 5 chain restaurants, the same one or 2 hamburger places, 3 or 4 other fast food restaurants, the same one or 2 "home improvement" stores, the same one or 2 (now just one, considering that Borders is out of business) book stores, etc. etc. Sad.

40 days ago

Speaking as a heterosexual male, I find them totally without sex appeal. I like beautiful women with naturally large breasts. I like beautiful women with not so large breasts. This American fixation on breasts I don't quite understand and never have, but even if you have the fixation, I still don't see how you'd find fake breasts (and any that I've seen are obviously fake, no matter how well done the surgery has been) appealing.

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Votes on this review: 2 Helpful / 0 Funny / 1 Agree / 1 Disagree
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